Cathy Galvin’s ‘Rough Translation’ – a review

My review of Cathy Galvin’s pamphlet, Rough Translation, is up on the Everybody’s Reviewing site.  Here’s the link.

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Sarah James micro-reviews Beyond the Tune

In her most recent micro-review post, Sarah James says:

The vivid sensual details of the first half of the pamphlet bring a whole era to life, with subtly startling yet apt memorable lines, such as “tannin, bitter through the Tate & Lyle scree”.

Of the collection’s darker side:

Not all stories from the era are sweet though, a darker side revealed in the hauntingly beautiful poems of the second half that gradually bring us back through poems that could be then or now to the present day and then the present day looking back, linking us again to the pamphlet’s opening.

On her journey as a reader:

Each re-reading brings new connections with these evocative and atmospheric poems.

and:

From “my spine | a river of running quavers that stick | to the soles of my sensible shoes” (Sin É) back to “ re-set your body clock to seal a time line” (Grace Notes), and then immersed again in a constant invitation to “Slip beyond the tune.” (Grace Notes)

 

Sarah James has been widely published in poetry magazines and anthologies.  She has published four full-length poetry collections, most recently The Magnetic Diaries (Knives, Forks & Spoons Press) and plenty-fish (Nine Arches Press).  She co-edits poetry small press V.Press.

Beyond the Tune review: Under the Radar

Deborah Tyler-Bennett, reviewing for issue 15 of Under the Radar magazine (Nine Arches Press):

…the volume of poems that really blew me away this time was a slender pamphlet collection from Soundswrite Press, Jayne Stanton’s Beyond the Tune.  I’d heard Stanton read a few times, but that did not prepare me for the sheer elegance and grace of her first volume.

On lines from Flown, and Suave and Debonair:

…her collection… has a musicality to it and rare lyricism

On first reading Beyond the Tune:

…a collection I’d return to time and again, as poems were economic and demonstrated that, in the poetic line, less really can mean more.

 

 

Beyond the Tune review: London Grip New Poetry

London Grip’s poetry editor takes an optimistic view of two first collections from a new poetry press.

I’m delighted that Michael Bartholomew-Biggs has reviewed my pamphlet, Beyond the Tune, and Caroline Cook’s Primer: both 2014 publications from Soundswrite Press:

You can read it on London Grip New Poetry, here.

Incidentally, London Grip also published Vintage, the second poem in BTT,  this summer.  You’ll find it here.