Last call! Writing 201: Poetry

The Daily Post

Perhaps you already love writing poetry; perhaps you’re a poet and don’t even know it. Either way, Writing 201: Poetry begins on Monday, February 16, and we’d love to see you there!

Tell me more about this poetry thing…

Even though haiku
are all some of us can write*,
poems touch us all.

Writing 201: Poetry is a two week-course. Each weekday, you’ll receive an assignment with three parts: a prompt, a poetic form, and a poetic device. You choose which you want to explore (if any). An assignment might invite you to write a poem inspired by “forgiveness.” Then, you’ll have the option to write using a particular form that we’ll introduce and explain (say, couplets). Finally, we’ll throw in an optional poetic device for you to use (for example, a synecdoche). Try all three, or any combination of them.

For a fuller description of the course, head to Ben’s original…

View original post 245 more words

Advertisements

Massive Online Open Courses

Last week I blogged about some of the open workshops I’ve participated in at The Poetry School.  Indeed, there’s a wealth of free resources and courses available on t’internet.  Last year, I enrolled on the University of Iowa’s massive online open course (MOOC), How Writers Write Poetry.  (I’m genuinely curious about other poets’ writing processes and keen to try new ways into a poem).  It coincided with my return to work from sick leave, however, so I didn’t complete the course.  Having enjoyed the first two video tutorials and assignments, though, I’ve just re-enrolled.  Here are the details, cut and pasted from their latest email to my inbox:

Greetings from the University of Iowa’s International Writing Program!

We are delighted to invite you to join our new MOOC, How Writers Write Poetry 2015! This seven-week online course, beginning on March 23, 2015, offers an interactive progression through the principles and practice of writing poetry. The course is open to everyone in the world, free of charge, and will be taught in English. We hope you will join us!

Course video ~
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZOHgH2Y2lbE&feature=youtu.be

Registration ~
https://www.canvas.net/browse/canvasnet/uofiowa/courses/how-writers-write-poetry

Our instructors are Christopher Merrill, poet, University of Iowa Professor of English, and International Writing Program Director; and Camille Rankine, poet, Assistant Director of the MFA Program at Manhattanville College, and Editorial Director of The Manhattanville Review. No previous writing experience is necessary, only a stable internet connection. If you would like to take this course but do not have stable internet access, please contact us at distancelearning.iwp@gmail.com. Class will start on Monday, March 23, 2015.

And, who knows, in another (retirement) life, I may yet complete the University of Pennsylvania’s MOOC course: Modern & Contemporary American Poetry (AKA ModPo).  If you’re interested, this one starts on September 12th, but you can sign up now.

Whatever your interest or specialism, Coursera lists a host of MOOCs.  Go look!

Giving a reading

Roy Marshall’s comprehensive guide to giving a poetry reading:

Roy Marshall

rEADING

This piece is for poets who are going to be reading a set of 10, 15 or 20 minutes, or perhaps longer – the sort of length you might read as a guest poet or at the launch of your pamphlet or book.

I’ve been lucky enough to have given a few of these readings  (although they have been rather sparse lately so if anyone reading this would like me to read, please do get in touch! ) and I’d like to share some of my thoughts.

Of course you will bring your own approach and style to your reading depending on the type of work you write and the type of person you are. Here are some general points and ideas which might be worth considering. I’ve titled this piece ‘Giving a reading’ because you might like to view your reading as a gift to your listeners. Whether they have paid to see you or…

View original post 1,405 more words

The Poetry School

As I’ve said before, I thrive on poetry workshops as a kickstart to new writing (to say nothing of the excellent published poetry I’ve read in the process).  Then how come I’ve only recently begun to avail myself of all that’s on offer from The Poetry School?  There are face-to-face, downloadable and online courses to choose from. And there’s CAMPUS, the Poetry School’s social network , currently boasting 1,744 members engaged in poetry conversations through groups ranging from ‘What are you Reading?’ to ‘Web Curios’; from ‘News, Events and Happenings’ to ‘Competitions, Submissions and Challenges.’

There are no travel or accommodation costs to factor in, and ‘a night in’ doesn’t get much better than the free open workshops I’ve participated in to date.  Bookings are on a first-come-first-served basis, so signing up to CAMPUS and their email updates is a help there.  Assignments are posted to participants who then have 5-7 days to draft their poems before uploading them to the group a few days before the two-hour online workshop, facilitated by a group chat facility.  A transcript of the online chat session is made available a couple of days later so you can ponder over critiquing comments.  Writing in response to an assignment with a near deadline often works well for me: there’s little time for procrastination.

My first such was Kim Moore’s Put a Poet in Your Pocket, last May. It was refreshing (if a challenge in itself) to ‘live with’ my chosen published poem for a few days with ‘strict’ instructions to write down nothing in the way of ideas/notes before drafting my own poem in response.  Seven months later, I’m mightily pleased that the resulting poem has found a good home.

I rarely experiment with set forms, so Mosaics from the Broken Mirror – Writing and Revising the Ghazal was a real departure from the norm.  Jason Schneiderman’s excellent essays and the exemplar poems in the assignment made worthwhile reading.  And, who knows, I might someday produce a pleasing poem from the draft that currently hibernates in my WIP sub folder.

Tonight, I’ve another ‘night in’ planned, as participants of The List Cause open workshop will be entering the group chat room at 7PM for a two-hour workshopping session of each other’s list poems with tutor Beverley Nadin.  Bring it on, I say!

Oh, and that’s not all – I’ve signed up for Harry Giles’ open workshop: Beyond English – Poems in Constructed Languages.  So this weekend I’ll be googling Nadsat, Riddleyspeak, Klingon, Zaum and Lapine…